Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Tag: Welcoming

D.5.1 Placemaking & Wayfinding Signage

D.5.1 Placemaking & Wayfinding Signage

Action

Improve district and wayfinding signage.

Why

A successful downtown main street layout will include highly visible, easy-to-read, and decorative way-finding signage.  The goal is to have a positive experience for both the pedestrian and motorist who are navigating through the district.

How

There are numerous wayfinding and district signage plans available.  Once signage locations have been determined, it’s important to list all points of interest, municipal service locations, transit options, and other significant destinations.

CMSC Professional Affiliates

Search Downtown Resource Library

Continue reading

CMSC Webinar: CT Humanities Grant Funding for Main Street Projects

CMSC Webinar

CT Humanities Grant Funding for Main Street Projects

Webinar Summary

Are you looking for support for your public humanities projects on Main Street? Has your community started thinking how it will participate in the commemorations, celebrations, and reflections of the United States’ 250th anniversary? 

In this webinar, the CT Humanities Grant Team provides an overview of the grants they offer, what types of projects are eligible, the application process, as well as other resources available for our nation’s 250th anniversary.

What are the humanities?

“The humanities are fields of learning that help us understand and appreciate human history, culture, values, and beliefs.”

Initiatives that CT Humanities fund must fit into the definition of humanities. A initiative that is just focused on art without an opportunity for reflection, dialogue, or some sort of engagement would not qualify. A good example of a Main Street project that CT Humanities has funded is the Wethersfield Heritage Walk Expansion.


View the Recording


Other Resources

About CT Humanities

Founded in 1974, Connecticut Humanities (CTH) is an independent, non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. CTH connects people to the humanities through grants, partnerships, and collaborative programs. CTH projects, administration, and program development are supported by state and federal matching funds, community foundations, and gifts from private sources.

Contact Info

The first step to applying to CT Humanities for the first time is to email the grants team at grants@cthumanities.org to discuss your project. This is a required step.

View Other Webinars

Continue reading

D.4.4 Trees

D.4.4 Trees

Action

Develop, fund and implement an annual tree management and planting plan.

Why

Trees are an essential component in a downtown setting, providing beauty, cooling shade, community identity, traffic calming and fresh air. It is known that town centers and urban areas often are densely developed, paved, and have a lack of green space and trees. Trees should be maintained and appropriately reincorporated to our downtowns. Communities with trees as part of a beautification program send a positive message to potential investors, like new residents or developers. Educational tree care and planting programs that include volunteer opportunities increase social engagement and allow merchants, property owners and other community members to work as a team.

How

  • Utilize your public amenities or tree inventory and any previous community engagement feedback to create, fund and implement a tree management and planting plan that reflects community spirit and enhances the pedestrian experience. 
  • As part of your tree inventory or planting plan, have a goal of at least 80% of all trees being appropriate for the downtown. For example, they are an appropriate height, species, roots aren’t disrupting buildings or sidewalks, blocking traffic / safety signs or creating other safety hazards. 
  • Be sure all plantings are maintained throughout the year.
  • Encourage merchants and businesses to participate in the planting program.

Search Downtown Resource Library

Continue reading

D.4.3 Flower Program

D.4.3 Flower Program

Action

Develop, fund and implement an annual beautification plan including hanging flowers, planters and merchant window boxes.

Why

Main Street professionals know that a vital component of revitalizing commercial districts is flowers. Communities with thriving beautification programs send a positive message to potential investors, like new residents or developers. These communities see an increase in business sales. Consumers prefer to shop in pretty places, and pretty places increase the value of a product. Planting programs that include volunteer opportunities increase social engagement and allow merchants, property owners and other community members to work as a team. Bonus: Pollinators! 

How

  • Utilize your public amenities inventory and any previous community engagement feedback to create, fund and implement a flower/beautification plan that reflects community spirit and enhances the pedestrian experience. 
  • Be sure all amenities and plantings are maintained throughout the year.
  • Encourage merchants and businesses to participate in the flower program.

Search Downtown Resource Library

Continue reading

D.3.1 Lighting

D.3.1 Lighting

Action

Work with public works and public safety on addressing lighting deficiencies. Encourage them to update the lighting plan accordingly.

Why

Lighting can play a significant role in shaping the identity of a downtown. It helps create a sense of place, enhance safety and security and improve the overall quality of life for residents and visitors. 

How

  • Utilize your public amenities inventory and any previous community engagement feedback to create, fund and implement a lighting plan which includes energy saving and dark-sky-friendly practices. 
  • Develop and enforce policies and regulations to support the goals and objectives of the lighting plan. 
  • Review the plan every 5 years to keep up with industry standards and ensure a safe, sustainable, and equitable environment. 
  • Be sure that the lighting installations are regularly monitored, maintained, and repaired.
  • Get creative with your lighting to highlight your Main Street assets including merchant windows, public art installations, historic buildings and architectural features to provide an enhanced experience for residents and visitors.

CMSC Professional Affiliates

Search Downtown Resource Library

Continue reading

D.1.3.4 Pet Friendly

D.1.3.4 Pet Friendly

Action

Establish a pet-friendly culture in the downtown.

Why

When we welcome pets, we welcome their humans too. Pets can bring positive energy and encourage social connections on our Main Streets. Pet friendly accommodations and policies encourage foot traffic and increase support for businesses.  

How

  • Conduct a pet friendliness audit and hold community outreach events to understand existing conditions downtown. This process can be used to come up with opportunities for improvement. 
  • Share results of this audit, as well as any resulting goals and objectives, with developers, property owners and businesses. 
  • Install multiple pet waste stations along sidewalks, near or in public green spaces, and locations near pet-friendly residential complexes.
  • Install dedicated pet amenities such as a dog park and water fountains.
  • Provide businesses resources to help them understand the role of service animals and may provide treats and/or water bowls.
  • Develop, fund and implement a plan to properly maintain and advertise these amenities in the district.

Search Downtown Resource Library

Continue reading

D.1.4 Crosswalks

D.1.4 Crosswalks

Action

Provide and maintain quality crosswalks to make the pedestrian experience more welcoming and safe. 

Why

Crosswalks provide safe passage across streets and discourage unsafe crossings. They alert drivers to pedestrians. A well designed, ADA compliant system of crossings increases access to resources, provides a feeling of safety, encourages more foot traffic to support your downtown businesses and increases social opportunity. 

How

  • Conduct a crosswalk audit and hold community outreach events to understand existing conditions downtown. This process can be used to come up with opportunities for improvement. 
  • Plan for, fund, construct and maintain an adequate number of crosswalks that:
    • are clearly visible
    • have proper signalization
    • follow ADA best practices
    • calm traffic and increase safety

Search Downtown Resource Library

Continue reading

D.1.1 Bike-Friendly Culture

D.1.1 Bike-Friendly Culture

Action

Conduct community outreach. Research, develop and implement an active transportation plan that includes construction of (and signage for) safe, well-placed and attractive bike lanes and amenities throughout the downtown. 

Why

Active transportation, including bicycle riding, is a healthy, environmentally friendly, affordable, and fun way to make your journey to work, to shop, to play and to get back home again. If you use public transportation, sometimes you’ll need your bike to take you that “final mile” home from the train or bus. Main Street districts that have a bike-friendly culture enjoy improved safety, economic benefits and increased access to mobility options, overall vibrancy and foot traffic for your businesses. 

How

  • Conduct research and hold community outreach events regarding the needs and desires for active transportation downtown. 
  • Develop a master plan that includes bike lanes or bike corridors which link to multi-modal transit, housing, & employment centers, and connect downtown to other trails (if applicable).
  • Implement the plan. Construct protected bike lanes in your district using attractive visual contrast.
  • Conveniently locate bike racks in multiple locations throughout the Main Street district.
  • Develop and implement and plan for advertising available transportation options.

CMSC Professional Affiliates

  • Link to MP PA post

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

4

There is a master plan that includes bike lanes or bike corridors in which placement is researched, links to multi-modal transit, housing, & employment centers, and connects district to trails (if applicable).
There are protected bike lanes with attractive visual contrast.
Bike racks are conveniently placed in multiple locations.

3

There is a master plan that includes bike lanes or bike corridors, or a plan is in progress.
There are protected bike lanes with attractive visual contrast.
Bike racks are conveniently placed in multiple locations.

2

There is a plan that includes bike lanes or bike corridors, or a plan is in progress, but there are no bike lanes yet.

1

There are no plans in place.

-AND/OR-

There are no bike lanes or bike corridors.

Continue reading

D.7.3 Public Art Inclusion

D.7.3 Public Art Inclusion

Action

Improve the diversity and inclusion of the artists represented in public art.

Why

Public art should be made from artists who represent various identities within the community.

How

Working with art organizations, museums, and schools, establish a mechanism for recruiting and compiling a roster of artists representing all identities from the community at large.  This could be in the form of “a call to action” or a related to a specific community project.

Resources

Search Downtown Resource Library

Continue reading

D.5.2 Gateway Signage

D.5.2 Gateway Signage

Action

Improve district gateway signage.

Why

A welcoming gateway sign can significantly identify the neighborhood and help to brand the district.

How

Locations for gateway signage should be determined and approved by the municipality.  Gateway signage design should align with district visual identity in terms of color palette, typography, and imagery where possible.

Resources

CMSC Professional Affiliates

Search Downtown Resource Library

Continue reading

  • 1
  • 2

© Connecticut Main Street Center 
P.O. Box 270, Hartford, CT 06141 | 860.280.2337