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Tag: Streetscapes

Speclines

Speclines

Lighting for the long-term public good.

We exist to light the nighttime environment better. Our work goes beyond simply providing lighting solutions; it’s about improving the quality of life for communities, individuals, animals and plants.

We offer sustainable lighting solutions for municipalities and DOT, helping governments and communities decide upon long-term lighting solutions for streets, parks, and highways.

Interested in municipal solar lighting? It’s now more possible than ever, watch this video to find out how.

Services

Services include: Downtown Revitalization; Community & Economic Development; Mixed-use Development

Visit their website

Contact

Pail Finbow
190 Main Street
Sandwich, MA 02563
Pfinbow@speclines.net

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D.5.1 Placemaking & Wayfinding Signage

D.5.1 Placemaking & Wayfinding Signage

Action

Improve district and wayfinding signage.

Why

A successful downtown main street layout will include highly visible, easy-to-read, and decorative way-finding signage.  The goal is to have a positive experience for both the pedestrian and motorist who are navigating through the district.

How

There are numerous wayfinding and district signage plans available.  Once signage locations have been determined, it’s important to list all points of interest, municipal service locations, transit options, and other significant destinations.

CMSC Professional Affiliates

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

4
  • There is signage throughout the district signifying to visitors that they are in the district.
  • There is wayfinding signage throughout the district that helps visitors navigate their way around.
  • The signage is well maintained, clearly visible, easy to read, ADA compliant, and may change with seasons.
  • Signage creates and reflects a sense of place and community identity.
3
  • There is signage throughout the district signifying visitors are in the district.
  • There is wayfinding signage throughout the district that helps visitors navigate their way around.
  • The signage is in good condition but there are signs of wear and tear.
2
  • There is very minimal wayfinding signage.
  • The signage is inconsistent, bent, worn, and/or badly damaged.
1
  • There is minimal basic signage.

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CMSC Webinar: CT Humanities Grant Funding for Main Street Projects

CMSC Webinar

CT Humanities Grant Funding for Main Street Projects

Webinar Summary

Are you looking for support for your public humanities projects on Main Street? Has your community started thinking how it will participate in the commemorations, celebrations, and reflections of the United States’ 250th anniversary? 

In this webinar, the CT Humanities Grant Team provides an overview of the grants they offer, what types of projects are eligible, the application process, as well as other resources available for our nation’s 250th anniversary.

What are the humanities?

“The humanities are fields of learning that help us understand and appreciate human history, culture, values, and beliefs.”

Initiatives that CT Humanities fund must fit into the definition of humanities. A initiative that is just focused on art without an opportunity for reflection, dialogue, or some sort of engagement would not qualify. A good example of a Main Street project that CT Humanities has funded is the Wethersfield Heritage Walk Expansion.


View the Recording


Other Resources

About CT Humanities

Founded in 1974, Connecticut Humanities (CTH) is an independent, non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. CTH connects people to the humanities through grants, partnerships, and collaborative programs. CTH projects, administration, and program development are supported by state and federal matching funds, community foundations, and gifts from private sources.

Contact Info

The first step to applying to CT Humanities for the first time is to email the grants team at grants@cthumanities.org to discuss your project. This is a required step.

View Other Webinars

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D.4.4 Trees

D.4.4 Trees

Action

Develop, fund and implement an annual tree management and planting plan.

Why

Trees are an essential component in a downtown setting, providing beauty, cooling shade, community identity, traffic calming and fresh air. It is known that town centers and urban areas often are densely developed, paved, and have a lack of green space and trees. Trees should be maintained and appropriately reincorporated to our downtowns. Communities with trees as part of a beautification program send a positive message to potential investors, like new residents or developers. Educational tree care and planting programs that include volunteer opportunities increase social engagement and allow merchants, property owners and other community members to work as a team.

How

  • Utilize your public amenities or tree inventory and any previous community engagement feedback to create, fund and implement a tree management and planting plan that reflects community spirit and enhances the pedestrian experience. 
  • As part of your tree inventory or planting plan, have a goal of at least 80% of all trees being appropriate for the downtown. For example, they are an appropriate height, species, roots aren’t disrupting buildings or sidewalks, blocking traffic / safety signs or creating other safety hazards. 
  • Be sure all plantings are maintained throughout the year.
  • Encourage merchants and businesses to participate in the planting program.

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

Appropriate trees filter pollution, provide appropriate shade, are durable, and have a root system that doesn’t damage the sidewalks.

4
  • 80%+ of the trees are appropriate for the district
  • Trees are regularly maintained all year round to prevent overgrowth that blocks businesses & traffic/pedestrian signage and creates safety hazards.
3
  • 60-80% of the trees are appropriate for the district
  • Trees are maintained all year round to prevent overgrowth that blocks businesses & traffic/pedestrian signage and creates safety hazards.
2
  • Less than 60% of the trees are appropriate for the district
  • Trees are inconsistently maintained, overgrown, and blocking businesses & traffic/pedestrian signage creating safety hazards.
1
  • There are no trees.

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D.3.2 Graffiti Remediation

D.3.2 Graffiti Remediation

Action

Develop resources, policies, and programs to deter and remediate graffiti.

Why

Graffiti can give off a negative impression of disinvestment in your district.

How

Tactics to help improve graffiti remediation and prevention:

  • Have dedicated resources to remediate any graffiti within 24-48 hours of its discovery
  • Have dedicated resources to enforce ordinances against graffiti and investigate sources of graffiti
  • Have a public art program to enliven spaces and deter graffiti

Resources

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

4
  • There are active dedicated resources to remediate any graffiti within 24-48 hours of its discovery
  • There are active dedicated resources to enforce ordinances against graffiti and investigate sources of graffiti
  • The district has an active public art program to enliven spaces and deter graffiti
3
  • There are active dedicated resources to remediate any graffiti within 24-48 hours of its discovery
  • The district has used public art programs to deter graffiti in the past
2
  • There are dedicated resources to remediate graffiti
1
  • There are no dedicated resources to remediate graffiti

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D.3.1 Lighting

D.3.1 Lighting

Action

Work with public works and public safety on addressing lighting deficiencies. Encourage them to update the lighting plan accordingly.

Why

Lighting can play a significant role in shaping the identity of a downtown. It helps create a sense of place, enhance safety and security and improve the overall quality of life for residents and visitors. 

How

  • Utilize your public amenities inventory and any previous community engagement feedback to create, fund and implement a lighting plan which includes energy saving and dark-sky-friendly practices. 
  • Develop and enforce policies and regulations to support the goals and objectives of the lighting plan. 
  • Review the plan every 5 years to keep up with industry standards and ensure a safe, sustainable, and equitable environment. 
  • Be sure that the lighting installations are regularly monitored, maintained, and repaired.
  • Get creative with your lighting to highlight your Main Street assets including merchant windows, public art installations, historic buildings and architectural features to provide an enhanced experience for residents and visitors.

CMSC Professional Affiliates

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

Light Justice is the practice of planning, designing, implementing, and investing in lighting for historically neglected communities through a process of stakeholder respect and engagement. (From lightjustice.org)

4
  • Engaged with public works and public safety to address lighting deficiencies.
  • Engaged with public works and public safety to implement lighting plans that incorporate dark skies best practices, inclusion of the arts, and/or light justice best practices.
3
  • Engaged with public works and public safety to address lighting deficiencies.
2
  • Little or reactive engagement with public works and public safety to address lighting deficiencies.
1
  • No engagement with public works and public safety on lighting deficiencies.

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D.1.4 Crosswalks

D.1.4 Crosswalks

Action

Provide and maintain quality crosswalks to make the pedestrian experience more welcoming and safe. 

Why

Crosswalks provide safe passage across streets and discourage unsafe crossings. They alert drivers to pedestrians. A well designed, ADA compliant system of crossings increases access to resources, provides a feeling of safety, encourages more foot traffic to support your downtown businesses and increases social opportunity. 

How

  • Conduct a crosswalk audit and hold community outreach events to understand existing conditions downtown. This process can be used to come up with opportunities for improvement. 
  • Plan for, fund, construct and maintain an adequate number of crosswalks that:
    • are clearly visible
    • have proper signalization
    • follow ADA best practices
    • calm traffic and increase safety

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

4
  • Crosswalks are clearly visible
  • Crosswalks adequate signalization and follow ADA best practices
  • There are an adequate number of mid-block crosswalks
  • Crosswalks are constructed with state-of-the-art materials to enhance crosswalk safety
3
  • Crosswalks are clearly visible
  • Crosswalks adequate signalization and follow ADA best practices
  • There are an adequate number of mid-block crosswalks
2
  • Crosswalks are somewhat visible
  • Crosswalks have limited signalization and minimally follow ADA best practices
  • There are an inadequate number of mid-block crosswalks
1
  • Crosswalks are faded and not maintained
  • Crosswalks limited signalization and no further ADA best practices are in place
  • There are an inadequate number of crosswalks

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D.1.3.3 Sidewalk Maintenance

D.1.3.3 Sidewalk Maintenance

Action

Improve sidewalk maintenance.

Why

Sidewalks typically make up the vast majority of your district’s streetscape; therefore, they make a big first impression. If your sidewalks are covered in garbage, snow, weeds, or other debris it will give off a negative impression of disinvestment.

How

Tactics to help improve sidewalk maintenance:

  • Establish ordinances that clearly explain the roles and responsibilities for building owners and business owners for maintenance
  • Enforce ordinances consistently
  • There is a reliable, designated maintenance provider

Resources

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

Includes garbage, snow removal, debris and weeding.

4
  • Ordinances are in place that clearly explain roles and responsibilities for building owners and business owners for maintenance
  • Ordinances are strictly enforced
  • Performed maintenance by town, contracted service, or building owner/businesses is reliable and consistent
3
  • Ordinances are in place that clearly explain roles and responsibilities for building owners and business owners for maintenance
  • Performed maintenance by town, contracted service, or building owner/businesses is reliable and occasional inconsistent
2
  • Ordinances are in place that clearly explain roles and responsibilities for building owners and business owners for maintenance
  • Performed maintenance by town, contracted service, or building owner/businesses is reactive and frequently inconsistent
1
  • Ordinances are in place that clearly explain roles and responsibilities for building owners and business owners for maintenance
  • Performed maintenance is only done upon request

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D.1.3.2 Sidewalk Furniture and Fixtures

D.1.3.2 Sidewalk Furniture and Fixtures

Action

Provide and maintain branded, carefully curated public amenities such as lighting, benches, bike racks, garbage and recycling receptacles. 

Why

Public amenities invite people to spend time in the downtown and can help create feelings of welcoming, safety and a sense of “being someplace special”. Clean, well-maintained sidewalk furniture and fixtures show that a community cares and is willing to invest in their downtown. Planning a system of public amenities through branding, design, color and repetition will help to create your Main Street’s unique identity. 

How

  • Conduct a public amenity audit and hold community outreach events to understand existing conditions downtown. This process can be used to come up with a wishlist for improvements and help prioritize new amenities. 
  • If you do not already have updated branding or a color scheme for the downtown, consider hiring a landscape architect or marketing firm to help the district create a public amenity plan. 
  • Develop, fund and implement a plan to properly maintain these amenities in the district. 
  • Be sure local regulations and policies are in place to support installation and maintenance of amenities as part of any redevelopment project or new development.

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

Elements include benches, bike racks, garbage receptacles, recycling receptacles, and cigarette receptacles.

4
  • The sidewalks have at least 4/5 elements.
  • All furniture and fixtures are regularly maintained and cleaned.
  • Furniture and fixtures are branded.
3
  • The sidewalks have at least 3/5 elements.
  • All furniture and fixtures are regularly maintained and cleaned.
2
  • The sidewalks have at 2/5 or less of the elements.
  • Furniture and fixtures are sporadically maintained and cleaned.
1
  • There are no sidewalk furniture or fixtures.

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D.1.3.1 Sidewalk Conditions

D.1.3.1 Sidewalk Conditions

Action

Conduct community outreach. Design and construct sidewalks in the district that provide maximum connectivity and are compliant with accessibility standards. Develop a plan and budget to keep them well-maintained.

Why

Sidewalks connect people to local businesses, jobs, education, places of worship, social events, food resources and more throughout the downtown, and this encourages increased foot traffic and economic development. Utilizing a well-maintained, accessible sidewalk can also be a more healthy, environmentally friendly, affordable, and welcoming way to get where you need to go. 

How

  • Conduct a sidewalk audit and hold community outreach events to understand existing conditions of sidewalks downtown. This can include a wishlist for improvements, amenities and additional sidewalk connections. 
  • Develop, fund and implement a plan to properly maintain sidewalks in the district. 
  • Develop, implement and plan for advertising your sidewalk network. 
  • Be sure local regulations and policies are in place to support installation and maintenance of the downtown sidewalk system.

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

4
  • 80%+ sidewalks are smooth and even, not cracked, heaved, or missing
  • Sidewalks are wide enough to accommodate multiple users
  • Sidewalk ordinances are in place to clearly guide uses and usages that enhance the customer experience
3
  • 50-80% sidewalks are smooth and even, not cracked, heaved, or missing
  • Sidewalks are wide enough to accommodate multiple users
2
  • 40-50% sidewalks are smooth and even, not cracked, heaved, or missing
1
  • Less than 40% sidewalks are smooth and even, not cracked, heaved, or missing

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P.O. Box 270, Hartford, CT 06141 | 860.280.2337