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Tag: Placemaking

Speclines

Speclines

Lighting for the long-term public good.

We exist to light the nighttime environment better. Our work goes beyond simply providing lighting solutions; it’s about improving the quality of life for communities, individuals, animals and plants.

We offer sustainable lighting solutions for municipalities and DOT, helping governments and communities decide upon long-term lighting solutions for streets, parks, and highways.

Interested in municipal solar lighting? It’s now more possible than ever, watch this video to find out how.

Services

Services include: Downtown Revitalization; Community & Economic Development; Mixed-use Development

Visit their website

Contact

Pail Finbow
190 Main Street
Sandwich, MA 02563
Pfinbow@speclines.net

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Goman + York

Goman + York

Listen + Advise + Execute

Drawing on decades of experience, Goman + York’s primary mission is to develop realistic and actionable strategies that revitalize towns, cities and neighborhoods at the intersection of planning, economic development, and real estate development.

Services

Services include: Placemaking; Downtown Revitalization; Community & Economic Development; Mixed-use Development; Adaptive Reuse of Historic Buildings; Economic Health of the Downtown; Strategic Planning; Small Business Development

Visit their website

Contact

Denise Robidoux
EVP/COO
111 Founders Plaza, Suite 1000
East Hartford, CT 06108
860.798.2804
drobidoux@gomanyork.com

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D.5.1 Placemaking & Wayfinding Signage

D.5.1 Placemaking & Wayfinding Signage

Action

Improve district and wayfinding signage.

Why

A successful downtown main street layout will include highly visible, easy-to-read, and decorative way-finding signage.  The goal is to have a positive experience for both the pedestrian and motorist who are navigating through the district.

How

There are numerous wayfinding and district signage plans available.  Once signage locations have been determined, it’s important to list all points of interest, municipal service locations, transit options, and other significant destinations.

CMSC Professional Affiliates

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

4
  • There is signage throughout the district signifying to visitors that they are in the district.
  • There is wayfinding signage throughout the district that helps visitors navigate their way around.
  • The signage is well maintained, clearly visible, easy to read, ADA compliant, and may change with seasons.
  • Signage creates and reflects a sense of place and community identity.
3
  • There is signage throughout the district signifying visitors are in the district.
  • There is wayfinding signage throughout the district that helps visitors navigate their way around.
  • The signage is in good condition but there are signs of wear and tear.
2
  • There is very minimal wayfinding signage.
  • The signage is inconsistent, bent, worn, and/or badly damaged.
1
  • There is minimal basic signage.

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CMSC Webinar: CT Humanities Grant Funding for Main Street Projects

CMSC Webinar

CT Humanities Grant Funding for Main Street Projects

Webinar Summary

Are you looking for support for your public humanities projects on Main Street? Has your community started thinking how it will participate in the commemorations, celebrations, and reflections of the United States’ 250th anniversary? 

In this webinar, the CT Humanities Grant Team provides an overview of the grants they offer, what types of projects are eligible, the application process, as well as other resources available for our nation’s 250th anniversary.

What are the humanities?

“The humanities are fields of learning that help us understand and appreciate human history, culture, values, and beliefs.”

Initiatives that CT Humanities fund must fit into the definition of humanities. A initiative that is just focused on art without an opportunity for reflection, dialogue, or some sort of engagement would not qualify. A good example of a Main Street project that CT Humanities has funded is the Wethersfield Heritage Walk Expansion.


View the Recording


Other Resources

About CT Humanities

Founded in 1974, Connecticut Humanities (CTH) is an independent, non-profit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. CTH connects people to the humanities through grants, partnerships, and collaborative programs. CTH projects, administration, and program development are supported by state and federal matching funds, community foundations, and gifts from private sources.

Contact Info

The first step to applying to CT Humanities for the first time is to email the grants team at grants@cthumanities.org to discuss your project. This is a required step.

View Other Webinars

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D.4.3 Flower Program

D.4.3 Flower Program

Action

Develop, fund and implement an annual beautification plan including hanging flowers, planters and merchant window boxes.

Why

Main Street professionals know that a vital component of revitalizing commercial districts is flowers. Communities with thriving beautification programs send a positive message to potential investors, like new residents or developers. These communities see an increase in business sales. Consumers prefer to shop in pretty places, and pretty places increase the value of a product. Planting programs that include volunteer opportunities increase social engagement and allow merchants, property owners and other community members to work as a team. Bonus: Pollinators! 

How

  • Utilize your public amenities inventory and any previous community engagement feedback to create, fund and implement a flower/beautification plan that reflects community spirit and enhances the pedestrian experience. 
  • Be sure all amenities and plantings are maintained throughout the year.
  • Encourage merchants and businesses to participate in the flower program.

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

For example: Planters, hanging baskets, etc.

4
  • There is a seasonal flower program in place that reflects the community spirit and enhances the pedestrian experience.
  • There is a designated contract or organization that is responsible for seasonal flower program.
  • The flowers are maintained throughout the year to keep up the appearance and to fix any damages.
  • Merchants and businesses participate in the flower program.
3
  • There is a seasonal flower program in place.
  • There is a group of volunteers, a designated contract, or an organization that is responsible for seasonal flower program.
  • The flowers are maintained throughout the year to keep up the appearance and to fix any damages.
2
  • Flowers are initially planted by the municipality, district program, or other community organization.
  • There is no designated group responsible for seasonal flower program.
  • The flowers are not regularly maintained throughout the year to keep up the appearance and to fix any damages.
1
  • There are no flowers.

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D.7.3 Public Art Inclusion

D.7.3 Public Art Inclusion

Action

Improve the diversity and inclusion of the artists represented in public art.

Why

Public art should be made from artists who represent various identities within the community.

How

Working with art organizations, museums, and schools, establish a mechanism for recruiting and compiling a roster of artists representing all identities from the community at large.  This could be in the form of “a call to action” or a related to a specific community project.

Resources

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

Identities: Gender, Generation, Race/Ethnicity, Abilities, LGBT+

4
  • Public art is made from artists who represent various identities of the community.
  • There is not a majority of any one identity represented.
  • There is a strategy in place to welcome a diversity of artists.
3
  • Public art is made from artists who represent various identities of the community.
  • The makeup of the public art artists skews towards a certain identity.
  • There is a concerted effort to diversify artists.
2
  • The artists are representative of one certain type of identity with a one or a few individuals representing other identities.
  • There is acknowledgement to increase diversity, but no efforts have been made.
1
  • Artists are homogenous in terms of individual identity.
  • There is no effort to be reflective of the community.

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D.7.2 Public Art Promotion

D.7.2 Public Art Promotion

Action

Improve the promotion of your district’s public art.

Why

Public Art often identifies the personality of a community, celebrates heritage and tradition, enhances the pedestrian experience, and provides color and vibrancy to the district.

How

Many times, public art becomes the identifying feature of the district.  Installed public art can be promoted through the district’s website, on social media, in all printed materials, in annual reports, through photography, and specific promotional video footage.

Resources

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

4
  • Public art information is easily found online through a dedicated webpage or website, and in print.
  • Public art is incorporated into the branding of the district.
  • Public art is encouraged, solicited, and incentivized through established programs.
3
  • Public art information is easily found online through a dedicated webpage or website, and in print.
  • Public art is encouraged and solicited through established programs.
2
  • Public art information is in print.
  • Public art is encouraged and solicited on an occasional basis.
1
  • There is no promotion of public art.

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D.5.2 Gateway Signage

D.5.2 Gateway Signage

Action

Improve district gateway signage.

Why

A welcoming gateway sign can significantly identify the neighborhood and help to brand the district.

How

Locations for gateway signage should be determined and approved by the municipality.  Gateway signage design should align with district visual identity in terms of color palette, typography, and imagery where possible.

Resources

CMSC Professional Affiliates

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

4
  • There is gateway signage indicating to visitors that they have entered the district.
  • Signage creates and reflects a sense of place and community identity.
  • It is maintained year-round.
3
  • There is gateway signage indicating to visitors that they have entered the district.
  • It is maintained year-round.
2
  • There is minimal signage, such as a road sign, and it is not clearly distinguishable.
  • Maintenance is inconsistent.
1
  • There is no gateway signage.

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P.3.1 Event Strategy

P.3.1 Event Strategy

Action

Develop an event’s strategy that aligns with your district’s assets, positioning statement, strategic plan, and national/local trends.

Why

Events take a lot of resources; ensure the events your district hosts align with and enhances the vision and branding you aspire to achieve so your resources are being invested in wisely.

How

Some tips:

  • Events are driven by the local market, current events, and national trends.
  • Each event has a target market identified and aligns with the district brand.
  • All events have clearly defined goals and objectives.
  • Events include sustainability best practices.

Resources

CMSC Professional Affiliates

  • Link to MP PA Post

Search Downtown Resource Library

Main Street Management Assessment Rubric

Scoring Standards

Note: Promotional activities include special events that typically happen on an annual or seasonal basis, and retail promotions are events that highlight goods and services offered by district businesses. Ideally, a district should have a healthy mix of both types of promotional activities.

4
  • Opportunities are driven by the local market, current events, and national trends
  • Informed by identification of target audiences and aligned with district brand
  • Events have clearly defined goals and objectives (for example, driving traffic to district, celebrating historic/heritage/culture, fundraising, retail promotions, etc.)
  • Events include sustainability best practices
3
  • Opportunities are driven by the local market, current events, and national trends
  • Informed by identification of target audiences and aligned with district brand
  • Events have clearly defined goals and objectives (for example, driving traffic to district, celebrating historic/heritage/culture, fundraising, retail promotions, etc.)
2
  • Events have clearly defined goals and objectives (for example, driving traffic to district, celebrating historic/heritage/culture, fundraising, retail promotions, etc.)

-OR-

  • Events are not regularly reviewed for viability (e.g. legacy events continue without review).
1
  • Events have no clearly defined goals and objectives (for example, driving traffic to district, celebrating historic/heritage/culture, fundraising, retail promotions, etc.)

-OR-

  • No events are held.

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Connecticut Main Street Center

P.O. Box 270
Hartford, CT 06141
860.280.2337

© Connecticut Main Street Center 
P.O. Box 270, Hartford, CT 06141 | 860.280.2337